Arts and Sciences
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Arts and Sciences

PROGRAM AT A GLANCE

STARTLOCATIONDELIVERYSTATUS
SepEdmontonIn person
Drayton ValleyIn person
Open
Limited
Waitlist
Full
Upcoming
 
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QUICK FACTS

Program length

8 months

Credential

Course Credits

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TUITION & FEES


Canadian
Total: $6,343.00

International
Total: $16,033.00

 
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ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

65% in English Language Arts 30-1, or 75% in English Language Arts 30-2, or equivalent

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Course Listing

Course length in fall and winter terms can vary. Courses are offered in a condensed eight-week format in the spring term. Not all courses are offered every term.

The maximum recommended course load for an Arts and Sciences student is five courses per term.

Course CodeTitleCredit
Courses - 16 weeks
ANTH1000 (O)
This course general introduction to anthropology presents central concepts and key issues in the four main subfields—archaeology and biological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology. Topics include evolutionary theory, human evolution and diversity, culture change, social organization, and symbolic systems. Students will explore broadly the question of what it means to be human.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ARTH1002 (O)
An introduction to the developments in art, architecture, and print culture in Western Europe, this course begins with the Italian Renaissance and ends with French Realism. Students will learn critical observation skills as the course draws on various scholarly strategies for interpreting visual material and cultural histories. Additionally, students will build on their existing writing skills and develop an interdisciplinary academic vocabulary.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BIOL1007 (O)
This course provides an introduction to cell structure and the function of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Major topics include the chemical and molecular composition of cells, subcellular components, metabolism, and information flow.  These topics address how cells harvest and use energy, how cells reproduce, and how information in DNA is stored, transmitted, processed, and regulated. Pre-requisites: Biology 30 and Chemistry 30.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
EASC1002 (O)
This course is an introduction to earth sciences and physical geography. Topics explored will include the four major earth systems—atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (water), geosphere (earth), and biosphere (life)—and how these systems relate to human populations. Students will also explore how earth scientists conduct research, including types of analysis and technologies used in the field. There will be a special focus on the circulation of water and the atmosphere, and how these processes drive the distribution of life on the planet and shape the landscape we see. The course will also discuss many of the current issues surrounding human-environment interactions, including, but not limited to, climate change, erosion, natural disasters, air and water pollution, and freshwater resources.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BIOL1008 (O)
This course examines the diversity of life on earth from the origins of life through the evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.  Using a phyletic approach to classification, the major taxonomic groups of organisms are introduced, including prokaryotes, numerous protists, plants, fungi, and animals. Features that adapt these organisms to their environment are emphasized using Darwinian evolution as the underlying principle.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BIOL2008 (O)
Students will learn the basic properties of ecosystem, community and population ecology, including energy transfer, mineral cycling, community structure and dynamics, competition, predation, and population dynamics. Students will also perform lab and field work.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
STAT1151 (O)
Students will learn the basic principles of statistics, acquire the skills to solve elementary statistical and probability problems, and gain hands-on experience with well-known statistical software, as well as basic methods for collecting data. Students will also learn the main tools of descriptive statistics to visualize collected data, analyze data distributions, and establish correlations and regressions between random variables. The course will also cover the main tools of inferential statistics for estimating mean values and proportions by confidence intervals, hypotheses testing, and one-way ANOVA. Applications are taken from wide range of subject areas such as biology and environmental science, business and economics, health sciences, education, crime and law, politics, social studies, and sports and entertainment.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 18 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
CHEM1002 (O)
This course emphasizes the importance of chemical equilibrium as it applies to gases, acids and bases, solubility and precipitation reactions, and complex ion formation. Also studied are kinetics (rates of reactions, differential and integrated rate laws, the Arrhenius equation), catalysts, thermodynamics (spontaneity, entropy, free energy), and electrochemistry (balancing redox reactions, and calculating standard and non-standard cell potentials), with emphasis on some practical applications related to batteries, corrosion, and industrial processes.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1002 (O)
Students examine the interaction between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include the fundamental principles of microeconomics; supply and demand; markets and welfare; government intervention; behaviour of the firm; market organization; and income distribution.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1008 (O)
Students examine how the economy behaves at the aggregate level and how national income is measured and determined. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics; measuring gross domestic product, inflation, and unemployment; demand including the multiplier process; supply, business cycles, and long-term growth; money, banking, and monetary policy; inflation; interest rates; stagflation; deficits and fiscal policy; exchange rates and balance of payments; exchange rate policy; purchasing power, and interest-rate parity.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
CHEM1001 (O)
Students are introduced to the basic principles that form the foundation on which higher chemistry courses are built. This course covers fundamental chemistry concepts such as atomic theory, bonding models, periodicity of elements, and stoichiometry, as well as the nomenclature used in organic and inorganic chemistry. Energy changes associated with chemical transformations are discussed. Pre-requisite: Chemistry 30.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 15 Work Experience
3
CLTR2228 (O)
This course will explore a variety of popular literary and visual forms, and examine the history, social functions, and concerns of popular fiction and visual cultures. Potential genres of study may include graphic novels, romance, science fiction, detective fiction/mystery, young adult literature, and slam and other forms of popular poetry, as well as visual art forms such as documentary, social media, and graffiti art. Using these texts as a lens, students will explore how the phenomenon of popularity and “mass appeal” relates to issues of cultural capital and literary taste. Particular attention will be paid to defining popular culture across time and place, and examining the role of audiences and their reception of popular forms of representation.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1001 (O)
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL1011 (O)
This course introduces students to formal and rhetorical writing practices at the post-secondary level, with an emphasis on literary analysis and close reading. Instruction and practice will be integrated with the study of literature drawn from a broad range of historical periods, cultural perspectives, social contexts, and literary genres (including fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction articles and essays, news media, and other cultural texts). Specific themes and texts will vary between sections.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510 (O)
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in professional contexts. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types and styles of technical communication, including technical descriptions, proposals, reports, online documents, and instruction manuals. Students will also learn to organize information, write clearly and concisely, rigorously edit their work, cite sources appropriately, and apply APA formatting to a variety of documents. In addition, students will examine effective document design and the use of visual aids, and will be required to create and deliver presentations based on these principles. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2550 (O)
The course has a strong focus on essay composition and analysis. The assignments are designed to encourage critical and analytical reading, thinking, and writing. This course also introduces and demonstrates the APA method of citation. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000 (O)
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
INST1000 (O)
This course focuses on the history, identity, and culture of Indigenous peoples in Canada, with a special focus on Treaties 6, 7, and 8 in Alberta. Beginning with the history and geography of Indigenous peoples and Turtle Island (North America) and ending with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), this course provides a big-picture overview of Indigenous Studies in Canada. Key topics and themes may include the following: contact and the fur trade era, colonization and settlement, the Royal Proclamation, the Indian Act, the bison hunt, identity, the TRC, missing and murdered Indigenous women, children in care and the welfare system, decolonizing Canadian law, gender and identity, status, determinants of health, impacts of residential schools, racism and stereotypes, the reservation system, reclaiming and celebrating culture, language and storytelling, the Sixties Scoop, and trauma. This course utilizes media such as podcasts, videos, blogs, and interactive maps to complement traditional course readings and may also include a community participation component.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
POLS1000 (O)
Designed to present a critical overview of the major concepts and themes in political science, this course introduces the major subfields, including Canadian politics, political theory, international relations, comparative politics, and gender and politics. It addresses many traditional subjects of the field, such as power relations, theories of the state and democracy, international institutions, evolving conceptualizations of citizenship, and political economy. The course further examines critical questions surrounding colonialism and race relations, the politics of poverty and inequity, and the role of the media in political controversies.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
POLS1010 (O)
This course explores the development of Canadian political institutions and political issues in Canada.  The student will learn about contemporary Canadian politics by examining the evolution of federalism, the Constitution, parliament, Aboriginal and minority rights, the welfare state, multiculturalism, and similar topics.  The course focuses on teaching critical thinking and writing skills by testing normative and empirical theories against Canadian historical and contemporary evidence.  Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1040 (O)
This course is the basic foundation course in psychology. It provides an introduction to the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. This course examines the evolution of psychology, research methods, descriptive statistics, the brain and behaviour, human lifespan development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, conditioning and learning, and memory. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1050 (O)
Build on your introductory knowledge of the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. Focus on the study of cognition (thinking), intelligence and creativity, motivation and emotion, personality, health, stress, and coping, psychological disorders, therapies, and social behaviour. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1060 (O)
This course introduces the scientific study of behaviour and human development. You will learn terminology and theoretical concepts common to psychology. You will learn about the dominant theories in psychology today and the scientific process. You will also learn about human development across the lifespan; processes of the mind including consciousness, learning, and memory, cognition and intelligence, emotion and motivation; and social behaviour. The concepts of stress and health and psychological health and illness are introduced.  Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC2010 (O)
Study the biological, cognitive, moral, emotional, and social changes that occur in an individual during the human lifespan. Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC2450 (O)
Acquire an overview of the common psychiatric conditions and their symptoms, causes, and treatment modalities. The role of the mental health worker as part of the multidisciplinary team working with clients with mental health disorders is addressed. You will discuss attitudes, stigma, and the influences of culture. Class readings, web-based learning, group discussions, and assignments help illustrate this material.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI1000 (O)
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI2025 (O)
This course introduces students to the sociological study of crime through theoretical and practical analyses, including the examination and attempted explanation of crime, crime patterns, social processes leading to criminal behaviour, and responses to crime.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI2373 (O)
This course examines the experience of dying and death through various socio-cultural contexts. Students will be exposed to theoretical and methodological issues in the study of death and dying.  Questions relating to life and living as well as dying and death will be explored and addressed. The course highlights the importance of paying attention to the experience of dying and death that is common to all species and every culture.  It exposes students to the reality of dying and death that is often denied in North American culture today.  The course also seeks to demystify death by allowing students to see it as a common human experience thereby equipping students with the knowledge and skills necessary to begin to deal with dying, death, bereavement, and grief. Students will focus on the topics of aging, the dying process, death, bereavement, and grief as they relate to individuals and caregivers. Current North American practices regarding death will be explored, as well as cross-cultural interpretations of dying, death, and bereavement. The course also addresses ethical issues related to dying and death in contemporary North American institutions and communities.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
WMST2010 (O)
This course is a critical feminist examination of embodied lives in differing social locations. The course challenges the traditional dichotomies of mind/body, culture/nature, and public/private in the treatment of such topics as the feminization of poverty; sexualities, reproduction, and family life; violence against women; women and religion; masculinities; and culture and body image.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
INST1152 (O)
This course is an introduction to Plains Cree (Y dialect) grammar and vocabulary, with practice in speaking. No prior Cree knowledge is required. This course is open to non-Cree speakers only.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Additional note

Courses marked with (O) are available as Open Studies courses.