Disability Studies
Apply Now

Disability Studies

PROGRAM AT A GLANCE

STARTLOCATIONDELIVERYSTATUS
SepEdmontonIn person
EdmontonIn person
Open
Limited
Waitlist
Full
Upcoming
 
More details

QUICK FACTS

Program length

2 years

Credential

Diploma

More details

TUITION & FEES


Canadian
Total: $12,849.50

International
Total: $31,889.50

 
More details

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

60% in English 30-1 or 60% in English 30-2 or 60% in ESLG 1860 or equivalent More details

Course Listing

You must complete 22 courses to graduate. Courses are listed below by term to show the recommended path to completing the program in two years as a full-time student.

Course CodeTitleCredit
Term 1 - 16 weeks
COMM1007 (O)
This course focuses on the development and practice of writing skills and forms of written communication required for success in educational and human services settings. Topics include an overview of the writing process, using correct grammar, developing writing strategies, writing essays, writing for business, and proofreading.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB1000
This course provides students with an overview of human growth and development across the lifespan. Students will examine typical development and theories in terms of biological, psychological, and sociological domains as they occur throughout the lifespan.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMP1016 (O)
This course provides learners with the skills they need to create the documents, spreadsheets, and presentations needed in college human services programs and employment in human services.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 45 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB1002
This course introduces students to foundational knowledge for supporting individuals with disabilities. Students will examine the evolution of social-cultural perspectives of persons with disabilities and the subsequent treatment. Students will reflect on the scope and role of the disability service worker.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
CBLE1010
This introductory course for students in a Community Studies program provides the opportunity to explore the variety of organizations, programs, and services offered in the community. Students will research community resources, agencies, and services, and field trips will provide them with a unique opportunity to get to know their community. Students will then critically reflect on their experiences and the importance of service to self and community.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
Term 2 - 16 weeks
COMM1001 (O)
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB1003
In this course, students are introduced to the concepts and principles that are foundational in guiding the development of prosocial behavior and self-regulation skills for persons with developmental disabilities. Students will develop observation and documentation skills as they note how behaviour acts as a means of communication and/or a response to the environment.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB1005
Students will examine various conditions that impact individuals across the lifespan. Students will discuss current definitions, characteristics and traits, and aspects of support.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB1004
This course examines planning strategies that will help people with developmental disabilities access meaningful participation within their home and community. Students will examine different types of planning in the context of utilizing strengths.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB1100
This practicum provides students with an opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills for supporting individuals with intellectual disabilities in appropriate disability-service settings under the supervision of the practicum supervisor and a designated mentor. Students will be expected to practise observation skills and to interact supportively with people. In the lecture portion, students will discuss observations, relationships, and planning, in addition to emergent topics. This is an integrated placement throughout the semester.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 200 Work Experience
7
Term 3 - 16 weeks
DISB2005
In this course students will continue to examine various conditions that impact individuals across the lifespan. Students will discuss current definitions, characteristics and traits, and aspects of support.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB2002
This course will cover diverse family structures and dynamics of family within the context of supporting a family member with disability. Students will examine ways to support family members who act as natural supports and learn to connect families with a range of supports in their roles as advocates.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB2006
This course continues to survey different types of planning for creating responsive environments for persons with developmental disabilities. Students will incorporate ideas based on individual strengths and interests in such areas as the arts, sports and spirituality in developing plans to build capacity and meaningful participation.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB2008
This course provides students with opportunities to describe relationships and environments for supporting individuals’ participation in the community. Students will examine types of inclusion, employment opportunities, social capital, and natural supports.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
CBLE2010
This course allows students to further explore opportunity in the variety of services offered to persons with developmental disabilities in the community. Students will participate in service activities in different agencies and sites. Students will critically reflect on the experiences in seminar.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
Term 4 - 16 weeks
DISB2003
This course will focus on an examination of social contexts and issues in the field such as human rights, government legislation and regulations, advocacy, ethics, and philosophies. Students will examine the impact of social issues and context for persons with disability who live in poverty and who experience abuse.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB2000
This course will survey disability/mental health from a holistic and intercultural practice perspective. Students will examine the western medical model of illness and alternative cultural practices in disability and mental health. Students will investigate common mental health disorders in relationship to disability and review emerging supports from various perspectives.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DISB2007
This course focuses on the development of organizational skills and leadership styles that are necessary to lead programs in the disability services sector. Student will examine leadership skills, teambuilding approaches, staff development and appraisal methods, aspects of financial management, and conflict management strategies.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
Elective3
DISB2100
This final practicum provides students with an opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills for supporting individuals with intellectual disabilities in appropriate disability-service settings under the supervision of the practicum supervisor and a designated mentor. In addition to using observation and interacting supportively with people, students will be expected to plan and implement activities relevant to the individuals and the agency. In the lecture portion, students will discuss working with diverse families and communities in collaboration, the role of the support worker in observation, documentation, the importance of relationships and self-advocacy, and working as a team member. This is an integrated placement throughout the semester.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 200 Work Experience
7
ELECTIVES
COSW1050 (O)
Examine the historical foundations of Aboriginal culture.  Study the key events that have impacted Aboriginal individuals, families, and communities.  Focus on the application of Aboriginal cultural awareness and knowledge of Aboriginal history to community support practice.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DEMC1011 (O)
This is a creative and dynamic approach to dementia care that is suitable for caregivers, both formal and informal, in a variety of care settings. Comprehensive information about dementia from diagnosis to end stage is discussed in a practical and interactive manner.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
INST1000 (O)
This course focuses on the history, identity, and culture of Indigenous peoples in Canada, with a special focus on Treaties 6, 7, and 8 in Alberta. Beginning with the history and geography of Indigenous peoples and Turtle Island (North America) and ending with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), this course provides a big-picture overview of Indigenous Studies in Canada. Key topics and themes may include the following: contact and the fur trade era, colonization and settlement, the Royal Proclamation, the Indian Act, the bison hunt, identity, the TRC, missing and murdered Indigenous women, children in care and the welfare system, decolonizing Canadian law, gender and identity, status, determinants of health, impacts of residential schools, racism and stereotypes, the reservation system, reclaiming and celebrating culture, language and storytelling, the Sixties Scoop, and trauma. This course utilizes media such as podcasts, videos, blogs, and interactive maps to complement traditional course readings and may also include a community participation component.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1040 (O)
This course is the basic foundation course in psychology. It provides an introduction to the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. This course examines the evolution of psychology, research methods, descriptive statistics, the brain and behaviour, human lifespan development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, conditioning and learning, and memory. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
RHAB1001 (O)
Learn the fundamental concepts and theories specific to rehabilitation and gain an introduction to the field of rehabilitation medicine. Examine the common practices and unique roles of physical therapy, therapeutic recreation, and occupational therapy, and explore the skills, roles, and traits of the therapy assistant.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI1000 (O)
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
WELL1000 (O)
Further your understanding of the field of therapeutic recreation and learn about the models of care in the therapeutic recreation process that guide service delivery. Discuss the Leisure Ability Model as a framework to service, with a focus on promoting a client’s wellness through goal-oriented leisure activities.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
WMST2010 (O)
This course is a critical feminist examination of embodied lives in differing social locations. The course challenges the traditional dichotomies of mind/body, culture/nature, and public/private in the treatment of such topics as the feminization of poverty; sexualities, reproduction, and family life; violence against women; women and religion; masculinities; and culture and body image.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Additional note

Courses marked with an (O) are available through Open Studies.

Students may also apply for transfer credit for approved post-secondary work completed at another institution. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that electives are approved for their program of study. Any questions about options can be directed to the associate or program chair.